Once Upon a Time, When the Cubs were Bought by a Family

The Ricketts Family owns the Cubs. That sentence has a certain lasting ring to it. We've all followed the travails of how the Cubs ownership has transitioned from the now bankrupt Tribune company and was midwived through the gnarly fingers of real estate magnate Sam Zell, finally getting delivered into our proud new Papa's (Tom Ricketts) loving grasp. To celebrate this rite of passage, I decided to learn more about the events that took place over 90 years ago when the last dynastic family came into control of our Chicago National League franchise.

Sherman, set the Wayback Machine to 1916.

January 16th, 1916 is when Charles Weeghman bought the Chicago Cubs ballclub from Charles Murphy and Charles Taft. Murphy had been the owner in the glory years of Tinker to Evers to Chance circa 1906-8. Charles Taft owned the Cincinnati Times-Star and was the half brother of US President #27, William Howard Taft (in office, 1909-1913) who was the first US President to throw out a ceremonial  ball on opening day (1910).

Weeghman was the owner of the Chicago Whales in the Federal League. The Federal league started in 1913 and was essentially a minor league circuit but in 1914 proclaimed themselves to be a third major league. The Whales won the league title in 1915 (bragging they were the best baseball team in Chicago that year, woo) but the league was put out of business after losing an anti-trust suit at the conclusion of the 1915 season. The suit was presided over by eventual Baseball Commissioner Kenesaw Mountain Landis. Landis was  supposedly a trust buster (but obviously not) and that decision would lead to the owners handing over the keys to the commissioner's office when the Black Sox gambling scandal developed in 1919-20. Weeghman was permitted to buy the Cubs out of that event and with co-owner, Harry Sinclair (of Sinclair Oil) they were allowed to merge the Cubs and Whales. Thus, back to the Cubs came the Whales manager Joe Tinker and a few of the other Whales star players including outfielder Dutch Zwilling and now much older, three-finger Mordecai Brown to join/rejoin the team. Owning the Cubs had it's perks with the press back then too. As owner of the Whales, Weeghman was villified for being in it for the money but upon becoming  the Cubs owner the press portrayed him as  a sportsman who was there because of his love for the game.

Did I mention he brought to the team a new ballpark? Weeghman park was built in 1914 on vacant land purchased by Weeghman from the Chicago Lutheran Theological Seminary.  Weeghman hired the architect who had built Comiskey Park, four years earlier. The new facility sported 16,000 seats. We all know how Tom Ricketts first actions were about refurbishing the facilities (the trough vs stall debate). Under Weeghman, in addition to a new ballpark he was credited with the innovation of putting another type of stall in the back of the stands, where food and beverages could be purchased. Previously, only the walking, hawking beer and peanut vendors sold to the fans. He is also credited with initiating the policy that fans could keep balls hit into the stands although it took years before that policy was woven into the fabric of baseball everywhere.

It's about the economy, stupid. Ringing a bell Mr. Zell? The deepening national recession took it's toll on the Weeghman Cubs leading to his selling of the team. To keep himself solvent, Weeghman sold more and more of his Cubs stock to one of his original minority interest partners, William Wrigley.

Wrigley started out as a scouring soap manufacturer in the 1890's but that morphed into a baking powder business. He used to give away two sticks of chewing gum with every can of baking soda as a promotion but when the gum became more popular than the powder he went into the chewing gum business. Wrigley's initial investiment in the Cubs was $50,000 and he had little involvement with the team until 1917.

As a club director, Wrigley persuaded Weeghman to go to California for spring training (not so coincidentally, Wrigley would buy Catalina Island in 1919). Wrigley believed in keeping large cash reserves and never borrow money which made his financial position strong in the context of a crumbling economy. Then came the crash of 1918 and Weeghman was deeply in debt. By December 1918, Wrigley attended his first Cubs stockholder meeting  where Weeghman resigned as club president. Team manager, Fred Mitchell became the new president and a sportswriter, Bill Veeck (Sr), became vice president and both were supported by Wrigley. Veeck ultimately became Wrigley's right hand man and team President (and it would be his son, Bill Veeck Jr,  who would be credited with planting the ivy on the Wrigley Field outfield wall in the late 1930's). By 1919, Weeghman went bankrupt and Wrigley recieved all of his stock, so Wrigley was now the largest shareholder of the team. Finally, by 1921, Wrigley took total control of the club when he purchased a large stock interest from Albert Lasker. Wrigley and Lasker had battled over many issues and eventually Lasker tired of the wrangling. Lasker has been credited as the founder of modern advertising including Sunkist Oranges.

Wrigley's team in 1921 wasn't so good. The Cubs landed in 7th place just ahead of the perennial doormat Phillies who would remain woeful for decades more. The '21 Cubs finished with a record of 64-89, some 30 games behind the champion Giants. Manager Johnny Evers was replaced by catcher, "Reindeer" Bill Killefer, whose playing days ended in 1921 as well. The Cubs had acquired renown pitcher Grover Cleveland Alexander in the 1918 season for cash from the Phillies and he was still their best pitcher. Wrigley had much to do with the Alexander acquisition as well. After arranging a golf meeting in Pasadena to discuss terms including the promise to pay Alexander's wife $500 per month for as much as 3 years, while Alexander was away during WWI. Wrigley kept this promise. Alexander, also known as "Old Pete", in 1921, was still the team ace at age 34 with a 15-13 record. Awesome, considering this was a 64 win team.

The starting 8 for the majority of that season wasn't much to remember. Here they are, "You're Chicago Cubs", circa 1921: Catcher Bob O'Farrell (90 games), 1B Ray Grimes (147), 2B Zeb Terry (122), 3B Charlie Deal (122), SS Charlie Hollocher (137), LF Turner Barber (90), CF George Maisel (107) and RF Max Flack (130). Several of these Cubs would retire shortly after this season (Deal, Maisel and Terry) and looking at their stats, it probably was for obvious reasons.

Opening day 1921 was at Wrigley Field on April 13th vs the Cardinals. Starting off the season with a bang, the team won 5-2. In fact, the Cubs won 6 of their first 8 games before reality set in.

Hippo Vaughn was also on the '21 Cubs. He's better known for the double no-hitter on May 2nd, 1917, where Vaughn and Fred Toney of the Reds dueled into extra innings but both pitchers had no hitters through 9 innings. Of course, the Cubs lost in 10 when Vaughn lost his no-no.

Who can forget Abraham Lincoln "Sweetbreads" Bailey pitching for the '21 Cubs? He got into 3 games for 5 innings before he got shipped off to Brooklyn where his career ended.

Hopefully, Mr. Ricketts will have a MUCH better honeymoon season.


I want to acknowledge an excellent book written in 1999 by Peter Golenbock, titled: Wrigleyville: A Magical History Tour of the Chicago Cubs as a major source for this article. It's well written and a recommended read.


ricketts spent the spring signing more fan autographs than the entire team combined.

i like his statement he made a few days ago about not meddling with the team's everyday operations and leaving it to the GM/manager/scouts/etc.

he also seems adamant in interviews that this is a ricketts family team, not just "his" team.

...i second that "Wrigleyville" book recommendation, too.

I'm really hoping that Ricketts, Wilken, and the depth of our farm system can turn this into a team that develops the core of the team from within and then uses it's impressive revenue to augment where needed. If that happens, the Ricketts family will be loved by Cubs fans for a long time.

Thanks for that last comment, Charlie, on the previous thread. It's why I like this site so much. I don't really need to do any homework, you guys just do it for me, out of passion.

I even like the manipulation of stats to make a point (not meant for you).

Rob G really should get some kind of award for this site for the comments (especially now that Chad seems to be gone -- that's a joke chad) and AZ Phil.

And Rob seems to have every baseball player in the MLB in some iphone contraption.

Anyway, I don't eat and sleep baseball anymore like I used to so I sure enjoy you guys bickering. I can't bicker much cuz, as I demonstrated, I'm sort of an ignoramus about stats.

I do know, however, that A Soriano can't hit his way out of a paper bag if he's lobbed a bunch of off speed stuff.

EDIT: In his defense, it better be pretty good off speed stuff but that still means he's a dead bat in the playoffs.

I do live and breathe baseball right now (it's rarely a good thing), so I have to hope that I don't go overboard when I respond to others' comments; I'm glad I didn't in this case. And, like I said, I'm with you on Fukudome as a Cub. (I'm also with you on Soriano's abilities at the plate.)

I think it's weird how the Cubs have such a twisted history with the White Sox. There's the Veeck thing of course, which has always been pronounced wrong by his own family (It should be VEEEEEEEK not veck).

But there's also the Harry Caray thing, who I'll never forget immortalizing Walt Williams on Channel 44 with, "There he goes, spitting into his helmut again. What a hairdresser he would be!"

That of course was in the days when he said stuff like, "that wouldn't be a home run in a phone booth". Which I never heard him say with the Cubs. I won't even talk about RAHHHHHHHHHHHD Carew.

such a twisted history with the White Sox
Considering the two teams have been around more than 100 years it's surprisingly small in terms of overlap, imho but when there is convergence it's memorable:

other than Veeck the list isn't that long, of course there is the nightmare of Ron Santo as a WSux secondbaseman


and Steve Stone as a player and then as a broadcaster, thanks to Dusty and Kent Mercker (although without Stoney moving on we'd miss on the BB and Len Kasper era).

Weeghman being allowed to purchase the Cubs and merge his Federal League Champion Whales and the Cubs contributed to the Cubs winning the pennant in 1918. The only other Fed team that merged with an MLB outfit was the St. Louis Terriers, which was merged with the St. Louis Browns when Terriers owner Phil Ball was permitted to buy the Browns and Sportsman's Park (Sportsman's Park was owned by the Browns, and the Cardinals were the tenant) as part of the MLB-FL settlement. Players on the six other Fed League teams were sold off piecemeal to the higest bidder.

Recent comments

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  • based on what SF has been doing every other year lately, getting access to the postseason playoffs seems to be what's important. bring on dat short series!

    that said, skipping the sudden death 1-game WC would be nice from here on out.

  • I know what you are saying, but I feel compelled to point out that there's no such thing as luck, curses, etc. The Cubs this year have as good as a chance as the Pirates to move on to the next round. If the Cubs proceed to the next round or not tomorrow, it will not be because of luck, but because one team outlasted the other. When/if the Cubs are lucky enough to make it to the league series, that's where they may find their biggest challenge. The Dodgers have a good, deep pitching staff.

  • debuting the new format 1 game "sudden death" WC matchup at yankee stadium does a perfect job of showing the intense emotion and drama this game can be.

    that said, i'm ready to not see yankee stadium or hear fans at yankee stadium for another 5 and 1/2 months. at least i don't have to sit through the braves with their "tommy hawk chawp" this postseason.

  • i'd like to know why the mlb.tv internet radio feed of the game (which is always delayed by a few seconds at best) is almost a minute faster than the ESPN cable TV coverage. wtf?

  • i dont know what order they'll be in, but i pretty much expect fowler/schwarb/rizzo/bryant/montero/castro/lastella/arrieta. any change at all (aside from the first 4 guys) wouldn't shock me, though. coghlan is still a wildcard in the lineup equation...plus joe could always march d.ross out there with very slow arrieta pitching.

  • Yup. Have to agree. Baseball, like golf, certainly has that psych component for the player. There is no real reason why a fielding position should affect a batting average. The Cubs are 106 years over due for a little luck. Don't you guys think so? Maybe the rookies can bring some dumb luck on.

  • probably stacking capable lefties vs cole while keeping the "hot" castro in the game. fwiw, he's 1-6 lifetime with 0 bb/k vs cole (double).

    i chalk bryant's issues at the plate while playing OF up to coincidence so far.

  • I will call your dead horse, "Trigger".

    In one game, when anything is possble, I am glad that Joe Maddon is our Manager.

    He knows the stats better than all of us. It would seem, IF La Stella gets the start at 3B, it will be only up to the point that they were to get the lead (crosses fingers). From everything I have read, the game will be managed like a hoops game: offense/defense. So expect La Stella to be out of the game by the 5th. This team is incredibly deep which is so surprising. We never woulda thunk it.

  • i don't know what their roster plans are, but j.herrera is out there practicing with the team.

    i can't imagine him making any roster, though. dude had 4 PA the entire month of sept. him being a good dude to be around while keeping the clubhouse loose seems to be his main role at this point.

  • I know it's my own personal dead horse to beat --but Bryant has been a lousy hitter when playing the OF this year. Given that it's his first playoff game, I really hope they keep him in his natural position and don't mess with his routine.

    Lousy as in 8-for-45 with one XBH and no HR. Small sample and all that -- but why take the chance?

  • hard to tell what's up given they'll probably want to stack as many good lefties into the lineup as possible.

    castro being a bit hot doesn't help things. if he was still cool they'd probably stick la stella at 2nd and call it a day.

  • Madden won't announce lineups but Stella is practicing at 3rd and Bryant in LF today. I'd rather see Bryant at 3rd but I guess Stella has been hotter than Coghlan.

    /edit. Though I guess they could be practicing this with the idea Stella would come in as a PH then double switch him to 3rd base and Bryant to LF. Hope that's the plan instead

  • I really like the sound of that idea about expanding the AFL to ten teams. Each org. gets to field more players.
    They should do that anyway, regardless of Adv. Instructs.

  • Dallas Beeler, Corey Black, David Garner, Pierce Johnson, Steve Perakslis, James Pugliese, Duane Underwood Jr, and Rob Zastryzny threw early-morning bullpen side-sessions at Riverview yesterday.  

    Underwood threw last, and received specific one-on-one instruction from pitching coach Mike Mason. 

  • HAGSAG: There are only five advanced instructs squads left, and presently the only "co-op" team operating is the Angels/Cubs.

    The league was originally established as a "parallel" league to the AFL (a sort of "junior AFL"), for players too advanced for traditional ("basic") instructs but who were unable to get placed on AFL rosters due to AFL player-limits.

  • He is but I would think it'd be better to start out with offense and then bring in Jackson and LaStella once they have a lead. Stella has very good PH #s too.