Author Archives

For your morning's amusement, a sampling of search results that have brought people to TCR.
If Wishes Were Ponies, Part1
''They are guys that can throw around 200 innings -- they can save your bullpen -- and you can have people win 15 or 16 games no matter what their ERA. If they can win 16 each and I win another 20 or 22, that will be fun.'' -Carlos Zambrano, on new teammates Ted Lilly and Jason Marquis
If Wishes Were Ponies, Part 2
'Boy, we'd be awfully deep and awfully talented.'' -Lou Piniella, on an injury-free pitching staff
Guess Who Said....
"I was embarrassed by the way I threw the ball last year. I want to improve on that." - Answer, Jacques Jones
Some quick reviews of what's going on elsewhere: Gonfalon Cubs looks at the possibility of a 98+ win season, and the connection between declining Cubs attendance and the off-season spending spree Cub Town uses the cool Sparklines to play guess the hitter and pitcher Bleed Cubbie Blue is down to number 9 on its All-time Great Cubs list, with Fergie Jenkins Cub Fan Nation has several funny Cubs-related photoshops CubsHub previews the 2007 Cardinals Goat Riders of the Apocalypse has a very good, funny look at the career arc of Bobby Hill. The View from the Bleachers asks Who Should the Cubs Draft? come June Allcubs.com prefers baseball without Sosa Our own Cubnut mourns the retirement of Jeff Fassero at A Hundred Next Years Regarding the role of bloggers and baseball, Bleed Cubbie Blue and Temporary Bleachers both have good commentaries. Pittsburgh Lumber Company, one of our fellow MVN blogs, previews the 2007 Cubs Also: I just saw the King of the Hill episode about The Jack and his Aces, little did I know that it was about legendary Softball pitcher Eddie Feigner, who has passed away John Smoltz, great advocate for Traditional Values, is getting a divorce Bernie Williams looks like he's going to lose out in the Yankees' roster crunch ESPN has been subpoenaed in the Harold Reynolds wrongful termination lawsuit. Regarding the termination of most of the Baseball Tonight crew: I'm in favor of it. The Hardball Times matches song titles with the state of Baseball entering 2007 Project Prospect compares Hughes and Bailey to once-prospects Prior and Beckett And Baseball Musings live-blogs from the Sports Business Conference at MIT
A couple of events this week have left me thinking about just where TCR and other sports blogs fit in the world of sports journalism. On the Thursday episode of ESPN’s “Around the Horn,” an execrable show in which sports “journalists” with faces made for radio “compete” at offering ten-second bits of “analysis” that are scored by some point system that is as arbitrary as it is absurd, Jay Mariotti concluded the program with a brief commentary about bloggers. No one has yet gone broke betting on Mariotti’s ability to explore new depths of idiocy, but this was new territory even for him.
My first exposure to fantasy baseball was through a guy who I was sort of friends with in middle school. There were maybe eight of us in the league, maybe five of whom were regulars, maybe three of whom sort of knew what we were doing, sort of. One guy, for instance, used his first eight draft picks to pick the Detroit Tigers' lineup. The guy who ran the league would “publish” a little newsletter at random intervals, updating the point standings (which he calculated on his own) and with funny little faux baseball articles. That must have been the 1990 or 1991 baseball season, but I still remember some of the players I picked for that team. God, they sucked. Sadly, it wouldn’t be the last team I owned that I then proceeded to populate with Has-beens, Never-would-be’s, The Suspended and The Dead. Here’s a fun romp through some of the low-lights of my fantasy career. (In a topic as bountiful as this, it will be tough to limit myself.) Hensley "Bam-Bam" Meulens, 1991 I’ve always been a sucker for players with cool names or nicknames....
The Arizona Republic is reporting that late yesterday or early today, someone broke in to Bob Brenly's home to steal the emmy he won for his work with Len last year. This demands a serious investigation. First of all, how did Bob Brenly win an Emmy? Ok, maybe it would be better to start with an easier problem: Who stole Bob's Emmy?
There's probably some law against driving and digital cameraing, right? I think that the real authors around here have a bunch of good things in the pipeline. Until then, here's a new thread.
Looks like it's been awhile since we had a new thread. What do you hope the different members of the Cubs got for Christmas? Jim Hendry: A treadmill, another executive assistant, and a Sam's card for discounts on off-the-shelf utility infielders Lou Piniella: An industrial-sized bottle of antacid and brochures for retirement condo. complexes in south Florida Matt Murton: A neon sign reading "Play Me" to hang by his locker Carlos Zambrano: Cleaning equipment, to help with all the broken bats and broken hitters he'll see in 2007. A good realator to help him pick out a permanent home on the North Side. Felix Pie: a Des Moines Chamber of Commerce Guide to Des Moines. Kerry Wood: Bubble wrap. Lots and lots of bubble wrap. Mark Prior: See Kerry Wood. Derrek Lee: Good news from the family doctor. Glendon Rusch: See Derrek Lee. Len and Bob: Shiney new contract extensions. Alfonso Soriano: A transport helicopter stocked full of Prozac, to drop on the Bleacher Bums after his first 0-for-8 streak Jacques Jones: Two transport helicopters. Rich Hill: A nice night out on the town with Zito and Glavine, to talk pitching over a few bottles of wine. Muskat, Marrioti, and Rogers: A coupon to Toys 'R Us, so that they can each buy a game of Clue. Jason Marquis: Either a gift certificate to the best neck massage therapist in Chicago, or special high-density baseballs. Ted Lilly: A holiday card from all the middle relievers, betting him a case of beer that they'll rack up at least 30 holds in his starts. TCR: Another year of great conversation, and a gritty 94-win Cubs team worth talking about.
In my lifetime, the Chicago Cubs organization has designated 19 different men as "manager." Those 19 include the undefeated Rene Lachemann, with a career record as Cubs manager of 1-0, and the hapless Joe Altobelli, at 0-1. There are the thoroughly mediocre records of Jim Lefebvre (162-162) and John Vukovich (1-1), which in the context of Cubs history, are actually quite impressive. When I learned in October that there would be a 20th Cubs manager in my lifetime, I began wondering, "who in their right mind would accept this professional death-sentence?" There's the whole 98-year thing, of course, but more practically, the Big Office in the Cubs' clubhouse is where managerial careers go to die. Throwing out Vukovich, Altobelli, and Lachemann, who collectively managed four games, and we have 16 Cubs managers in the last 30 years of Cubs baseball. Of those 16, 12 had prior managerial experience. They are:
Herman Franks Preston Gomez Charlie Fox Jim Frey Gene Michael Frank Lucchesi Don Zimmer Jim Lefebvre Tom Treblehorn Jim Riggleman Don Baylor Dusty Baker
The four without any previous major league experience, by the way, are:
Joey Amalfitano Lee Elia Jim Essian Bruce Kimm
Here's where it gets interesting. (At least, for me.) The collective managerial record of those 16, in their jobs before coming to the Cubs, is 4229-4282, for a .497 winning percentage. Almost perfectly average. Then, they arrived in Chicago.
Player A: Contract: 3 years (2006-2008), $16,000,000 Ages: 31-33 Career: .280/.328/.461/.789 amd 11 SB/162 Games A noodle-armed left-handed hitting right-fielder who struggles (to be generous) against left-handed pitching, he's also a great "hustle" and "character" guy. Player B: Contract: 5 years, $55,000,000 Ages: 32-36 Career: .263/.336/.419/.755 and 12 SB/162 Games A switch-hitter who can play all OF positions adequately and will appear on Sports Center with a couple of ridiculous Web Gems. Also a great "hustle" and "character" guy. Player C: Contract: 5 years, $44,000,000 Ages: 29-32 Career: .303/.350/.377/.727 and 52 SB/162 Games A noodle-armed left-handed hitting CFer. Yet another great "hustle" and "character" guy. Also a "True Leadoff Man" And just for kicks, Player D: Contract: Near league-minimum for 2007-2008, Arbitration Elgible 2009-2011, FA 2012 Ages: 25-29 Career: .303/.370/.462/.832 and 6 SB/162 Games A noodle-armed left-fielder who sometimes looks ugly out there, but by at least one measure has good range. Also considered a great "hustle" guy. I take it that you can figure out who these four gentlemen are. Player A is suddenly looking a lot more appealing than he did when he signed that contract last year. Player D looks golden. Or maybe that's just the sheen from his hair. Update Player E (as in Lee): Contract: 6 years, $100,000,000 Ages: 31-36 Career: .286/.340/.495/.835 and 13 SB/162 Games A right-handed hitting left-fielder with possible weight issues and a reputation for attitude problems/basic jerk-ness. The contract the Astros just handed Lee, in conjunction with the Pierre and Matthews contracts, is beginning to make that Soriano deal almost sort of look like something kind of reasonable. What's your early vote for the most ridiculous contract this off-season?

Pages

X
  • Sign in with Twitter