Fun With Small Sample Sizes

After 10 games, the 2012 Cubs are what we thought they were, a poor offensive team with moments of intriguing starting pitching. Here are some rather meaningless numbers I stumbled across...

Cubs 2012 P/PA - 3.71 (Team Leader: I Stewart 4.19)

Cubs 2011 P/PA - 3.74 (C. Pena 4.13)

Cubs 2012 BB/PA - 0.79 (J. Baker 1.76)

Cubs 2011 BB/PA - 0.71 (C. Pena 1.67)

Cubs 2012 SB/CS - 8/11 for 72.7% success rate (pace of 129/178)

Cubs 2011 SB/CS - 69/92 for 75% success rate

Cubs 2012 Offense - 4 Runs Per Game, 10th in NL

Cubs 2011 Offense - 4.04 R/G, 8th in NL



The Good: Clevenger (1.500 OPS), LaHair (1.119), Castro (.831)

The Okay: DeJesus (.799), Johnson (.779), Stewart (.749)

The Not Okay: Barney (.669), Soriano (.655)

The Awful: Soto (.538), Baker (.448), Mather (.282), Byrd (.212), DeWitt (.191)



Aramis Ramirez: 114/179/171 0 HR, 5 RBI, 5 R

Ian Stewart: 242/342/424 1 HR, 5 RBI, 4 R

Tyler Colvin: 350/381/600 1 HR, 5 RBI, 3 R


Soriano 2012: .313/.343/.313 5.7 BB%, 22.9 K%, .400 BABIP, 43.2 O-Swing% (swings at pitches outside zone), 54.3 O-Contact% (contact on pitches outside of zone when swinging)


Soriano 2011: .244/.289/.469 5.3 BB%, 22.2 K%, .266 BABIP, 43.9 O-Swing%, 60.4 O-Contact%



Cubs 2012 Pitchers: 2.63 K/BB ratio, 1.22 WHIP, 8.08 K/9, 1.022 HR/9

Cubs 2011 Pitchers: 2.11 K/BB, 1.41 WHIP, 7.68 K/9, 1.017 HR/9

Cubs 2012 Run Prevention: 4.80 R/G, 14th in NL

Cubs 2011 Run Prevention: 4.67 R/G, 14th in NL

Cubs 2012 Starters: 4.23 ERA, 9th in NL, 3.73 K/BB, .225 BAA

Cubs 2011 Starters: 4.79 ERA, 16th in NL, 2.12 K/BB, .276 BAA

Cubs 2012 Relievers: 5.47 ERA, 16th in NL, 1.53 K/BB, .250 BAA

Cubs 2011 Relievers: 3.51 ERA, 8th in NL, 2.09 K/BB, .233 BAA



The Good: Russell (0.00 ERA, 4/1 K/BB), Garza (1.23, 14/3), Dolis (1.80, 1/3), Dempster (1.88, 15/6), Samardzija (3.95 13/1)

The Okay: Lopez (4.50, 1/2), Volstad (4.95, 10/2)

The Not Okay:

The Awful: Camp (6.50, 4/0), Castillo (7.36, 5/2), Marmol (8.10, 4/4), Wood (11.57, 4/3), Maholm (13.50, 4/3)



roids work.

Rights fees paid by cable television channels are behind the growth in team values. Aggregate cable television revenue for baseball’s 30 teams has increased to $923 million from $328 million over the past 10 years. And thanks to new television deals inked by teams like the Houston Astros, Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim and the Texas Rangers that have yet to kick in, as well as the pending deal for the San Diego Padres and a likely new, rich deal that will begin in 2014 for the Los Angeles Dodgers, local television revenue could exceed $1.5 billion in 2015.


Both the Chicago Cubs, who rose 14% in value, to $879 million and the Philadelphia Phillies, who increased 19% in value, to $723 million, are expected to enjoy huge increases in local television revenue when their current deals expire. The Cubs contract with WGN, which televises about half the team’s games, ends following the 2014 season and its deal with Comcast SportsNet Chicago expires after 2019.

your 2015 World Champion Cubs!!!!

Cubs rank 4th in total valuation (don't ask me how they get these numbers), but have the 2nd worse debt/value ratio behind Mets and are 3rd in revenue brought in and operating income.

live sports TV is becoming a gold mine thanks to Tivo and other passive-watching tools.

people like to watch sports live, it's one area where Tivo isn't totally trampling programming.

delivery of a live-action 3 hour+ block of programming that people will watch for all 3 hours rather than watching the next day and skipping through commercials.

I understand that's how most people do it, but I actually prefer TiVo for sports for the opposite reason. I can watch a Bears game in 70 minutes, and if I time it right, I'm usually catching up to real-time right around when Cutler's throwing the game-ending pick.

LeMahieu enjoying Colorado Springs; 326/373/435 with a HR
Marshall: 3.1 IP, 1 SV, 2.70 ERA, 4 K, 2 BB, 1.8 WHIP
Cashner: 6.2 IP, 2.70 ERA, 6 K, 7 BB, 1.5 WHIP
Flaherty: 0/3 with 3 K's and 1 R
M. Gonzalez: 250/280/333 in 25 PA, 2 K, 1 BB
Colvin's #'s are in the post.

Byrd dives for a ball, looked a bit unnecessary, but regardless, a nice play. If he was on his feet, it's a double play.

Recent comments

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  • The Cubs had some good runs and nice winning streaks that propelled them to the playoffs. Austin Jackson wasn't part of that. I don't quite understand what it is about Jackson that they are so enamored with.

  • I think the strike zone was very inconsistent, but it's hard to blame the loss on the ump. They had chances and mistake pitches and just couldn't cash in. Lackey ran the ball inside and outside very effectively.

  • Correct. Castro 5th, AJax 6th; I'll edit my lineup post to fix this.

  • Lineup: Fowler, Soler, KB, Rizzo, Castro, AJax, Montero, Hendricks, Russell

  • if he put ajax 1st/2nd in the f'n playoffs he deserves to lose his nearly sure-thing MOY award to terry collins.

  • I believe Castro batting fifth, Ajax (LF) sixth

  • Maddon did not listen to me yesterday re Strop, or EricS on Schwarbs today.

    Wtf is up w/that?!

  • Crunch got his wish - Ajax not hitting 1-2 in the lineup ...

  • I know he's struggles against lefties but Schwarber seems zoned in - hope he starts tonight.

  • Awesome stuff, Phil.

  • listening on ESPN 1000, caller says Bill Welke will be the home plate ump today. Supposedly his reputation is for having an even bigger strike zone than last night's Phil Cuzzi. Some of the issues with bad umpiring come from an inconsistent strike zone. Hoping at least for consistency. Last night's called strike on David Ross was outright embarrassing for Cuzzi.

    That might work out in favor of Kyle Hendricks, who benefits much from a large strike zone.

  • it's kind of mesmerizing to watch
    should Theo add some Ted Abernathy videos for minor league pitching coordinator's use?

    sadly, Ted passed away in 2004 from complications of Alzheimers. I always loved the Cub bullpen trio of Phil Regan, Ted Abernathy and Hank Aguirre. As a kid, I even worked on both Phil Regan (very quirky delivery) and Ted Abernathy (extreme submarine) imitations when throwing a rubber ball against a wall. It wasn't a good imitation unless I could scrape my knuckles off the ground. I'll always have a soft spot in my heart for submariners.

  • HAGSAG: Chris Pieters was sent to instructs to develop his hitting, bunting, and outfield play (he is already a decent first-baseman).  

    Pieters is tall and rangy , a "long-strider" in the same mold as Trey Martin and Rashad Crawford. He is a very patient hitter (unusual for a hitter with his lack of experience) and has an outstanding (almost uncanny) eye at the plate, and he is a fast runner with unusually good baserunning instincts, and he is a good basestealer, too.

  • I doubt we will see Pedro in any more "high leverage" situations this series. With Hendricks and the pen today, we need Bryant-Rizzo-Castro to get going ASAP.

  • One funny thing to see before the game was the two submariner pitchers (David Berg and Corbin Hoffner) playing catch with each other. Both pitchers throw "submarine" even when they play catch, and it's kind of mesmerizing to watch, even for the other players. 

  • CUBSTER: One of the points of emphasis  at "basic" Instructs this year was teaching the position players the art of baserunning and base-stealing, like getting a good primary and seconday lead, reading the pitcher, cutting bases sharply, and different ways to slide to maximize the baserunner's chance to arrive safely.